beckycloonan:

inkytasty:

typette:

djlegz:

sizvideos:

Video

Assassin’s Creed screams in the distance

someone write a youth fantasy novel about this damn thing

Oh….my…..give this to me now.

*heavy breathing*

ok so was it abraham or david roentgen who LOVED springs

hungryghoast:

kiss-distinctly-american:

I’ve never wanted anything to be real as badly as I want this to be real.

do you mean this exchange? (it is) or that the account is run by a 13 year old (i hope it is too)

(Source: clarkethesharkmacarthur)

sexfactory:

nickminichino:

calaban1:

mystical-piscean:

sexfactory:

Annie Potts as Janine Melnitz in Ghostbusters (1984)

yes pls all

I’ve quit better jobs than this

why would you cap this without Ernie Hudson as Winston’s reply, “If there’s a steady paycheck in it, I’ll believe anything you say.”

now that’s real

unfortunately this gifset was made by a lonely gay woman who really only cared about Janine.

you know what? i 100% respect that. complaint retracted

calaban1:

mystical-piscean:

sexfactory:

Annie Potts as Janine Melnitz in Ghostbusters (1984)

yes pls all

I’ve quit better jobs than this

why would you cap this without Ernie Hudson as Winston’s reply, “If there’s a steady paycheck in it, I’ll believe anything you say.”

now that’s real

(via hungryghoast)

oneterabyteofkilobyteage:

original url http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Makeup/6822/

last modified 1999-06-12 23:11:08

i bet this this ahead of the curve blogger went on to great things

oneterabyteofkilobyteage:

original url http://www.geocities.com/Hollywood/Makeup/6822/

last modified 1999-06-12 23:11:08

i bet this this ahead of the curve blogger went on to great things

thesinglesjukebox:

GERARD WAY - NO SHOWS
[3.45]


He’s growing up…

Alfred Soto: Listen to the distortion and sweet pop voice — has Gerard been listening to Superchunk? Matthew Sweet? Of course not. Superchunk and Sweet would have ended this show of force at 3:12.
[5]

Mark Sinker: Nice people (probably) have a good (good-bad) time in a nearby room I’ve never entered. I don’t want to stop them; but I don’t feel invited in either, for solace or even curiosity’s sake. This mood may pass, but this isn’t the song to make this happen.
[4]

[Read, comment and vote on The Singles Jukebox ]

"It Won’t Work for You" b/w "Look What It Did to Watt"

abloodymess:

Peter Hook is such a dick.

nedraggett

abloodymess:

Peter Hook is such a dick.

nedraggett

barrybailbondsman:

crystalleww:

swoonstep:

EPISODE 10 - yr hosts (again)

Here’s the tenth episode of Swoonstep, a podcast where brilliant, cute, hilarious women talk music and crushes. This week on Swoonstep, your babely hosts are back solo to talk about a topic near and dear to their hearts: women in music and pop culture criticism. We also discuss our favorite music in 2014 so far. Plus, we cover a couple of weird crushes that just…haven’t come up in an episode of Swoonstep so far, including Crystal’s love of cheeseball Pitbull, Megan’s love of sad boy Burial, and our dislike of indie rockers (sorry boys).

We say this every week, but if you’re a woman (or non-cis dude) who wants to talk about music and talk about musician crushes, please reach out. Swoonstep aims to be a space where women are allowed to rant and rave and swoon with abandon because, for real, women are really the best. Women are thoughtful and deliberate and kind, biting and hilarious and brilliant. That’s important to us, so come hang out with us and let us hear your thoughts. Thanks for listening!

Just the two of us this week, but more guests coming soon.

Further reading:

Sasha Geffen’s “Radical Strain”
Lindsay Zoladz on Matangi and Born to Die
Julianne Escobedo Shepherd’s “I Came Dressed to Kill: Tracking the Nicki Minaj Makeunder”
Molly Lambert & Emily Yoshida @ Grantland
Pitch, Bitch!

A huge thanks to all our amazing guests and to everyone who listens. 

Without any conciliatory qualification: women do not write and talk enough about music. There aren’t enough spaces for our thoughts and there isn’t enough respect for our (multitude of) perspectives. I want to offer my support and encouragement to women who are interested in music. I want to read your writing and I want to talk to you about it. This is mostly directed at women who are publishing on Tumblr or Medium or Twitter (or their iPhone notes or their diary or the voice in their head) and might benefit from a space that is explicitly encouraging. Swoonstep is a place where you can be silly and serious at the same time. You can like whatever you like and Crystal and I will gush along with you. Never feel like you can’t be on this podcast. If you identify as a woman, we really, really want you here. Keep writing, keep pitching. One day I will get that VC money and you’re all getting a column. 

(via katherinestasaph)

xtjna:

predators literally love sex positivity and are the main supporters of it i just cant stress this enough obviously it started out with good intentions but its such an easy thing for evil manipulative people to latch onto and have people think theyre doing things under the guise of sexual freedom

(via crankyskirt)

oldtobegin:

interactyouth:

Inter/Act has been working with MTV’s Faking It on building a (more) true-to-life intersex character, Lauren (played by Bailey Buntain). We anticipated a few new people to our page, wondering what exactly intersex is. The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (at inter.act@aiclegal.org)
What is intersex?
Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!
What are some intersex conditions?
There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.
How common are intersex people?
Intersex people are roughly 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.
So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?
The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.
It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!
They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything. 
How does gender fit into intersex?
Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, intergender, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey 
How does intersex differ from transgender?
Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!
What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?
Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!
Can I use the word hermaphrodite?
No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you. 
What are some other terms I should know?
Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!
Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)
Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.
HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.
Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.
Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!
What are some other intersex resources?
We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.
What can you do as an ally?
Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

i guarantee that you know an intersex person, whether you know it or not. 

oldtobegin:

interactyouth:

Inter/Act has been working with MTV’s Faking It on building a (more) true-to-life intersex character, Lauren (played by Bailey Buntain). We anticipated a few new people to our page, wondering what exactly intersex is. The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (at inter.act@aiclegal.org)

What is intersex?

Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!

What are some intersex conditions?

There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.

How common are intersex people?

Intersex people are roughly 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.

So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?

The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.

It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!

They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything.

How does gender fit into intersex?

Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, intergender, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey

How does intersex differ from transgender?

Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!

What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?

Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!

Can I use the word hermaphrodite?

No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you.

What are some other terms I should know?

Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!

Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)

Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.

HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.

Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.

Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!

What are some other intersex resources?

We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.

What can you do as an ally?

Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

i guarantee that you know an intersex person, whether you know it or not. 

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