before i lose my style

Jul 26

20yardsoflenin:

"Wake Up" by the arcade fire is like if u slowed a Gorgoroth song to half speed, on this point I will brook no dissent

(Source: nowthenwhatever)

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Jul 25

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Anonymous said: i need a shirt that says #no bjs for lit bros (which is my new life motto)

tandess:

it’s a genuine battle cry

“For Willis, if your revolutionary thinking didn’t accurately reflect reality, it couldn’t change reality. In her version of liberation, sexual revolutionaries aren’t smug, performative hedonists who play out their fantasies in villas on Mustique; they wonder instead how thin the line is between courage and delusion while drinking coffee alone in their apartments or sitting on benches outside the Laundromat. And rock writers don’t turn their prose up to 11 to compete with the bands they’re covering, or get so bound up in the role of gnomic wizard that they can’t just shrug their shoulders and say, as Willis did, well, I was wrong about the Ramones; they admit to communing with what she called “the screaming teenager” inside. To Willis, acknowledging the real meant acknowledging that we are minds connected to bodies, and that what may not seem real at all — the unconscious and the psyche — are very powerful forces. Nearly every piece is a reminder that the culture we live in, even when we don’t profess its prevailing beliefs, has an effect on the psyche; that we internalize expectations even when we think we’re free; that we need to gather in groups to change our minds and the minds of others, because otherwise we stand alone in our pain and confusion, thinking that we’re the problem.” — NYT, on The Essential Ellen Willis (via katherinestasaph)

‘The Essential Ellen Willis’ - NYTimes.com -

To emphasize Willis’s continuing importance, her daughter, who was born in 1984, chose “Willis-like” writers of her own generation — Ann Friedman, Irin Carmon, Spencer Ackerman, Cord Jefferson, and Sara Marcus — to contribute prefaces for each decade. They rightfully note that Willis’s critiques remain depressingly relevant. (Take this sentence, written in 1979, in an essay on the rise of family values: “The pursuit of ecstasy — in freedom of the imagination and a sense of communal possibility as much as in sex, drugs, or rock and roll — was no longer our inalienable right. Babies, however, were a socially acceptable source of joy.”) But their prefaces are nearly indistinguishable from one another in sentiment and tone, and there’s a striking difference between those pages and the penetrative depth of Willis’s thinking — the result of a painstakingly slow writing process and scrupulous self-questioning that gave her work moral and intellectual authority. That disparity may lead one to wonder if such thinking is even possible at a time when discourse is shaped by the Internet, which demands self-congratulatory clique-building and fresh outrage every hour on the hour.

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Jul 24

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