ddmikeward: Is the middle-finger as popular in England as the two-finger sign you guys do (sort of like a backwards peace sign)?

scarygoround:

I think two fingers is a lot milder than one, and I don’t know which is more popular in this day and age - I always think two fingers is more funny than offensive. Flipping someone off and it really having aggressive intent - like when a country music crowd is angry with a performer for not supporting the troops (for example) - feels like an American thing.

any thoughts tomewing? (since you’re weighing in on essential Britishness)

aintgotnoladytronblues:


x

nick cave looks so different to me now whenever i see pictures of him without facial hair

aintgotnoladytronblues:

x

nick cave looks so different to me now whenever i see pictures of him without facial hair

(Source: styzles)

cussingskull:

skvaderkadaver:

Collaboration work between painter Leonora Carrington & Alexandro Jodorowsky in Mexico, 1957.

"During a party, Luis Buñuel, seduced by Carrington’s beauty and emboldened by the notion that she had transcended all bourgeois morality, proposed (with his characteristic bluntness) that she become his mistress. Without even waiting for her answer, he gave her the key to the secret studio that he used as a love nest and told her to meet him at three o’clock the next afternoon. Early the next morning, Leonora went to visit the place alone. She found it tasteless: It looked exactly like a motel room. Taking advantage of the fact that she was in her menstrual period, she covered her hands with blood and used them to make bloody handprints all over the walls in order to provide a bit of decoration for that anonymous, impersonal room. Buñuel never spoke to her again.”
- Alejandro Jodorowsky,  The Spiritual Journey of Alejandro Jodorowsky: The Creator of El Topo

cussingskull:

skvaderkadaver:

Collaboration work between painter Leonora Carrington & Alexandro Jodorowsky in Mexico, 1957.

"During a party, Luis Buñuel, seduced by Carrington’s beauty and emboldened by the notion that she had transcended all bourgeois morality, proposed (with his characteristic bluntness) that she become his mistress. Without even waiting for her answer, he gave her the key to the secret studio that he used as a love nest and told her to meet him at three o’clock the next afternoon. Early the next morning, Leonora went to visit the place alone. She found it tasteless: It looked exactly like a motel room. Taking advantage of the fact that she was in her menstrual period, she covered her hands with blood and used them to make bloody handprints all over the walls in order to provide a bit of decoration for that anonymous, impersonal room. Buñuel never spoke to her again.”

- Alejandro Jodorowsky, The Spiritual Journey of Alejandro Jodorowsky: The Creator of El Topo

(via tomewing)

dinuguan:

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

(Source: vital-dust, via detailor)

The belle of Yeovil, England, Polly Jean Harvey emerged from the English hinterlands a 98-pound blueswoman with a 200-pound voice. She wore beatnik black and comfortable shoes and fronted a spare, thrashy rock band like the journeyman guitarist she easily could have been. Last time through New York, though, Harvey went femme (sort of), in shocking eyeliner and a sheath-like cocktail skirt, singing the incendiary songs off To Bring You My Love like an avenging diva. While it might have read as do-me feminism from lesser figures, Harvey managed to make these vampisms ambiguous and otherworldly, while her voice—deep, throaty, unbelievably powerful—often threatened to break glass. She also happened to give one of the best rock shows of the year.
— so i ended up in the Oct 9, 1995 issue of New York while fact-checking a Stefon joke i planned to make on Twitter (naturally) and was reminded that one is always a stone’s throw from a truly execrable writeup of a female musician
crankyskirt:

mmmmmpomp:

Diana Vreeland

my home decor goal in life is to outdo diana vreeland

crankyskirt:

mmmmmpomp:

Diana Vreeland

my home decor goal in life is to outdo diana vreeland

i think my favorite thing about the incessant Ouija movie ads is their tag #Planchette

tomewing:

So I read Death Of Wolverine 1-4 by Charles Soule and Steve McNiven. (SPOILERS: Wolverine dies!) (You have to do that joke.) (There are actual spoilers in this post tho) It had two jobs, and did one of them exactly as fans - I’m guessing - might hope, and one maybe not.

The expected one was to do a Wolverine Greatest Hits EP - lone Canadian wild man; Madripoor hustler; Samurai; military experiment. Noticeably these are all solo Wolverine hits, none of the stuff he did with his band gets in. It’s a determined recap and tying off of the barnacled mythology around Wolverine the series-carrying star, which has the effect of reminding you that a) there aren’t THAT many kinds of Wolverine story, b) the kinds there are are all quite different from one another and c) none of them have ever really fixed themselves as the dominant type of solo Wolverine story. Wolverine is a tough guy you pour genre into.

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